2 tips for owners of new companies who plan to draw up dress code policies

2 tips for owners of new companies who plan to draw up dress code policies

2 tips for owners of new companies who plan to draw up dress code policies

16 June 2019
 Categories:
Business, Blog


If you have set up a new company and you have hired several employees, you should draw up a dress code policy. If you are planning to do this, here is some advice that may be of use to you.

Clarify what 'corporate wear' means in the context of your particular workplace

A lot of companies' dress code policies specify that their employees should wear clothing that is appropriate for a corporate environment. If you intend to do the same in the policy you are drawing up for your own business, then it is important to provide as much clarification as possible regarding what you mean by the term 'corporate wear', as this is a general term that can refer to an array of business outfits, which ranges from highly formal to slightly more laidback.

As such, if you don't want to have to endure any awkward conversations with your employees regarding their unsuitable clothing choices, then it is important to be as clear as possible about which garments are (or are not) acceptable.

For example, if your business deals with serious matters and, as a result of this, you want your employees to wear conservative and somewhat sombre clothing, in the form of tailored and neutral-coloured suits, dresses and skirts, then you might want to not only state this fact in your policy, but also clarify that these tailored garments should be free from any adornments (such as lace detailing on the dresses or skirts) or patterns (like floral or tartan prints).

Additionally, you might want to specify that any accessories worn with these garments (such as ties or belts) should also be plain and neutral-coloured and that any shirts that people wear are always buttoned up to the collar. To ensure that your employees fully understand what type of corporate clothing they will be expected to wear, it might also be helpful to include some visual examples of garments that you feel are in keeping with the look you want to achieve, in the printed copies of the policy.

Update your dress code policy as your business evolves

Most businesses change over time; they may grow larger, merge with other businesses and diversify or change the services or products they provide. If or when this happens to your business, it's worth reviewing your dress code policy and then revising it if you feel that it is no longer appropriate for your brand.

For example, if your business changes in such a way that you no longer have clients coming into your office but instead communicate with them mostly via email and phone, then you might want to allow your employees to wear slightly more casual types of corporate wear, as they won't necessarily need to look quite as formal as they did when they were meeting clients face-to-face on a regular basis. In this situation, you might want to alter the dress code policy so that it is more lenient (for example, you could allow your employees to wear a wider range of colours, more casual footwear and permit them to unbutton their suit jackets and the top buttons of their shirts).

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Develop a Brilliant Business

Hello! My name is Hannah and I'm here to help you to understand how you can develop a brilliant business. As a kid, I used to love playing Monopoly. I loved the exchange of money, the investments and the thrill of building a thriving business on the board. It might come as no surprise that as I have grown older, I have never quite let go of the idea of starting my own business. However, I knew that I would first need to develop my knowledge of the business world. I contacted some local business people and they have been giving me the inside track. I would like to share some of what I have learnt with you here on my blog.

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